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What is Docker?

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Docker, a software container platform, started as an open source project in 2013 and has evolved into a leading player in containerization. By running applications in isolated environments, Docker is used by developers to automate repetitive tasks like configuring development environments and by system administrators to package software into standardized units for testing and deployment.

Docker Containers

Docker containers allow teams to build, test, replicate and run software, regardless of where the software is deployed. And while Linux containers have been around for longer, Docker has become the go-to platform for IT teams.

The main advantage to using Docker containers is that they mimic running an application in a virtual machine, minus the hassle and resource neediness of a virtual machine. Available for Windows and Linux systems, Docker containers are lightweight and simple, taking up only a small amount of operating system capacity. They start up in seconds and require little disk space or memory.

Docker containers assure teams that software will always act the same no matter where it is - there’s no inconsistency in behavior, which allows for more accurate and reliable testing. The ability to isolate Docker containers lets teams sandbox multiple projects separately, avoiding confusion and reducing security risks. Docker containers also make it easier for teams to swap around project work, improving efficiency and reducing downtime.  

Docker Container Monitoring

Docker Container Monitoring with Opsview

Docker container monitoring with Opsview is done with the Docker Opspack, which offers comprehensive container monitoring coverage. With minimal setup and configuration, the Docker Opspack lets you customize your notifications and outage alerts, check service availability, drill down into infrastructure metrics, and much more.

One of the best benefits of monitoring Docker with Opsview is that you can easily share system statistics with other teams within your organization. Insights into vital information from your Docker hosts and containers, like CPU usage, memory usage, output and uptime are all readily available.

Of course, because of the complexity of what Docker offers, there are challenges that come with correctly configuring your monitoring. Our Ultimate Guide to Docker Monitoring discusses many of these challenges and offer comprehensive ways to get you to where you need to be.  

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