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CES 2015: Could IT Monitoring Restore Order to the Internet of Things?

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If you’ve been following all the hype at the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, then you’ve heard a lot about 4k, 3D Printing, Drones, and probably most importantly, the Internet of Things. With the future of consumer electronics being not only connected, but working with one another, things could get pretty complicated for the average consumer.

Just what is the Internet of Things (IoT)?

Well simply put, it’s a connected network of things. More specifically, it means more of the things that people own will be connected to each other and be able to not only communicate but also work with one another. Take for example the “things” in your home. Your thermostat could be connected to your car and be set to know when you come home and set the temperature (Nest actually already kind of does this). Or, your fridge is connected to your FitBit/phone to make sure the food you’re eating is the right food to meet your goals. However, being cozy warm and eating right are just the tip of the iceberg with the possibilities of the IoT.



Photo Credit:  http://www.businessinsider.com/growth-in-the-internet-of-things-2013-10

What’s that mean for you?

With the largest consumer electronic company in the world, Samsung, making a pledge that within just five years, all Samsung hardware will be IoT enabled, the possibility of having the internet of things will come sooner than we thought. Keep in mind, Samsung makes more than just televisions and have full lines of home appliances and is even planning to enter the automobile hardware space as well.

Average households currently own a whopping 24 electronic devices. With every electronic device now potentially having an IP address, how will the average consumer be able to make sense of all the integrations they could potentially have, let alone whether a device is even working or not? With some consumers still mastering Bluetooth connectivity and NFC (Near Field Communication), having every device not only connected to each other, but working with each other, could spell a disaster for the average household.

Internet of Things and IT Monitoring

One way to overcome this potentially confusing series of tubes is IT monitoring. Although mainly used to monitor larger networks of servers, hosts, and virtual machines, IT monitoring can be easily applied to IoT.  Monitoring could potentially give any household a complete single pane of glass view of all their electronic devices, integrations, and statuses of any device. What's more, is that monitoring can be extended to see any essential piece of information. Potentially, you could have a pane of glass of that tells you everything combined about your devices that surround your world. You would basically have a real time window of information that surrounds you at all times. Whoa.

Being able to visualize a network for a regular consumer can help make the Internet of Things not only reality, but also help with security and efficiency.  Otherwise, support departments are going to increasing quite a lot in the next five years.



“Honey, the dryer is operating at 48 degrees, thank goodness for Opsview. Also why is it in the kitchen?!"

Although the Internet of Things may be the biggest buzzword at CES 2015, IT monitoring might be the next big buzzword for CES 2020. That’s especially true if projections of 26 billion devices being connected by then becomes true. Take a look at some of things that monitoring has already extended into. Some prominent higher education institutions are already adopting and actively using the concept of IoT now. It’s something that actually might live up to the hype, as opposed to 3D printing cookies (which is actually really awesome, and a dangerous piece of technology).



The Human Race may not be ready for such power!

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